CReSIS collaborator and lead scientist featured in Vermont Quarterly newspaper

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CReSIS collaborator and lead scientist featured in Vermont Quarterly newspaper
Posted: March 12, 2015

 

— CReSIS collaborator Ian Joughin was featured in the University of Vermont's newspaper yesterday. His work as lead scientist garnered attention from the New York Times and the BBC. Joughin is senior principal engineer at the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory and a glaciologist at the lab’s Polar Science Center.

 

Read all about his recent research in the Vermont Quarterly.

BURLINGTON, VT — Last May, The New York Times reported that two independent teams of scientists had come to the same conclusion: the ice sheet covering western Antarctica is beginning to collapse due to global warming—and its continued melting appears to be unstoppable. Having ten feet of sea-level rise baked-in to the future of human civilization was major news for the day, and, surely, is major news for human civilization.

The lead scientist of one of these teams is Ian Joughin ’86 G’90—who received two degrees from UVM in electrical engineering. He’s now senior principal engineer at the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory and a glaciologist at the lab’s Polar Science Center. Including this new study, Joughin has had more than ten papers in the journal Science. He’s been to Antarctica and Greenland many times. Big-time polar research—and the media attention that comes with it—are familiar water for him.  Still, this report opened a flood.

 

Contributed photo | University of Vermont

“I'm sitting in the parking lot, talking to one reporter after another, including those guys from The New York Times and Skyping with the BBC,” Joughin says, laughing in recollection, over a cup of coffee at Uncommon Grounds in Burlington. “I've done a lot of press stuff, but I’ve not had to write down a list of ten reporters that I had to get back to. That was pretty crazy.”

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