CReSIS In the News

News

CReSIS in the News provides links to outside publications covering CReSIS research and activities. The feed is updated weekly from local, national, and international news sources. To subscribe to this feed, click on the orange icon below.

In Scientific American's recent feature article, "12 Events That Will Change Everything," CReSIS's interactive sea level rise maps were highlighted as part of the portrayal of the ramifiications of a "Polar Meltdown."
For 25 years, Lonnie Thompson has longed to take a field crew to Papua, home to the only tropical glaciers west of the Andes and east of Mount Kilimanjaro.
National Geographic Magazine utilized CReSIS data to create an image of Greenland ice sheet dynamics for a June 2010 article on melting glaciers. Click on this link to see the image and read the story.
Ellen Mosley-Thompson from Ohio State University and her team have removed the longest ice core ever extracted from Antarctica's Bruce Plateau.
Glaciers in the high heart of Asia feed its greatest rivers, lifelines for two billion people. Now the ice and snow are diminishing.
NASA's Operation IceBridge mission, the largest airborne survey ever flown of Earth's polar ice, kicks off its second year of study when NASA aircraft arrive in Greenland March 22.
This spring, Sonntag and other scientists return to the Arctic for big picture and little picture views of the ice as part of NASA's six-year Operation Ice Bridge mission -- the largest airborne survey of Earth's polar ice ever flown -- now entering its second year.
A team of researchers, including CReSIS's Leigh Stearns, have found that waters from warmer latitudes are reaching Greenland's glaciers, driving melting and likely triggering an acceleration of ice loss.
A multinational, robotic air corps is quietly invading the polar regions of the earth. Some catapult from ships; some launch from running pickup trucks; and some take off the old-fashioned way, from icy airstrips.
Full video coverage of Dr. Richard Alley's presentation at the 2009 American Geophysical Union meeting.
Reporter and photographer Scott Canon of the Kansas City Star just returned from a field season in Antarctica, where he ran into CReSIS researchers.
In the cover article of the latest issue of the Journal of Glaciology, engineers at the University of Kansas detail a special radar array they developed that is capable of depicting a 3D view of bedrock hidden beneath ice sheets three kilometers thick.
CReSIS scientists and collaborators describe SAR processes they used to determine bed topograhy and basal conditions near Summit Camp, Greenland in 2005.
In the cover article of the latest issue of the Journal of Glaciology, engineers at the University of Kansas detail a special radar array they developed that is capable of depicting a 3D view of bedrock hidden beneath ice sheets three kilometers thick.
Shridar Anandakrishnan of PSU corresponds about his research on Antarctica's Thwaites glacier.
The KU Aerospace Engineering's UAV team reports from McMurdo Station, Antarctica, on the Meridian's next string of flight tests.
Climate scientists are about to lose a NASA satellite that's been monitoring the Earth's polar ice caps since 2003. And a replacement won't be in orbit until at least 2015.
Science club students at Sunflower Elementary on Wednesday got an opportunity to learn about glaciers through volunteers with KU Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets. During a slideshow presentation, Marci Leuschen points to a campsite area that her husband Carl is staying for the next two...
The 1,100-pound Meridian UAV is designed to gather data on the ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland for CReSIS.

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