CReSIS Conference Presentations

News

By Beth Ruhl
Winter 2008

NATIONAL SCIENCE TEACHERS ASSOCIATION REGIONAL MEETING

CReSIS was one of many organizations that presented at the National Science Teachers Association Regional Meeting in Portland, OR, this November. K-12 Outreach Coordinator Cheri Hamilton and graduate students Ryan Bowman and Dana Atwood-Blaine presented several lesson plans for K-12 teachers from the Ice Ice Baby curriculum. These include how to make glacier goo, an exercise called “Are You Smarter Than A Straight-Line?” which showed how radars work, and exercises that demonstrated regelation and sea-level rise. CReSIS PolarTREC teacher Brandon Gillette also attended the meeting and explained how to become a PolarTREC teacher. Gillette traveled with CReSIS researchers to Antarctica in the winter of 2007 and sent travel logs to the United States

SACNAS

The Society for Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) National Conference was held in Salt Lake City from October 8-12, 2008. CRESIS sponsored a session entitled ‘Imaging of the Polar Regions’. Graduate student Nasbah Ben organized and chaired the session. Speakers included Mr. James Rattling Leaf, Dr. Sridhar Anandakrishnan, Dr. Daniel Wildcat, Dr. Derrick Lampkin and Dr. Terry Wilson. Dr. Vicky Lytle presented CReSIS in a session focused on NSF science and technology centers.

AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION’S FALL MEETING

CReSIS scientists presented more than twenty papers at the Fall AGU meeting. An estimated 15,000 scientists attended the meeting held in San Francisco, December 15-19, 2008. CReSIS also hosted a booth presenting the center’s latest results.

ECSU AT AFRICAN REMOTE FLIGHT LINES CONT’D SENSING CONFERENCE

Principal Investigator Dr. Linda Hayden and Chief Information Officer Anthony Adade of the ECSU Center of Excellence in Remote Sensing Education and Research presented a paper entitled, “Implementing Cyberinfrastructure in Support of Greenland and Antarctic SAR Data Sets,” at the African Remote Sensing Conference in Ghana this October. The paper detailed their work on the Polar Grid project, which supports data analysis and simulations for Polar Science and will process radar and seismic data collected in Southern Greenland and Antarctica. Their goal is to provide scientists with real-time data that allow adjustments to be made in the field. These data will help to predict sea-level rise and fall more accurately.