High School Seniors Receive a Behind-the-Scenes Tour of CReSIS

News

Spring 2010

Thirteen high school seniors admitted as top recruits to the University of Kansas’ Honors Program for the 2010-2011 school year toured CReSIS facilities on March 1 as a part of a Scholar’s Day event. The students participated in a question and answer session with CReSIS glaciologist Leigh Stearns, viewed radar technology in CReSIS labs, and visited with the Knowledge Transfer and Education departments. This was CReSIS’ first year participating in Scholar’s Day.

CReSIS’ collaboration with the Honors Program began when Stearns taught a freshman honors seminar course in climate change issues. When students responded well to the class, Sarah Crawford-Parker, Honors Program recruitment officer, contacted CReSIS for participation in Scholar’s Day. Parker said the Honors Program hosts these events in conjunction with the Office of Admissions to showcase the range of activities that KU offers to incoming students.

“The great thing about CReSIS is it brings together so many disciplines and subjects,” said Parker. “It was very easy for these students and families to see how this research is relevant and exciting."

Kristin Barkus, CReSIS Education Coordinator, led the students around the Center. She said students responded especially well to the data processing tour. “They were surprised when we described to them the amount of data on their computer compared to the amounts of data collected from the field. The scope of the data impressed them,” said Barkus.

Thomas Clark, a senior at Lawrence Free State High School, liked learning about the MCoRDS Depth Sounder radar on the tour. “I though the presentation about the ice sheets and how the glaciers are moving was pretty cool,” he said. Clark intends to study engineering at KU next fall after excelling at math and science throughout high school. He decided to attend KU after hearing positive feedback from current students.

CReSIS plans to continue to participate in Scholar’s Day in the coming years to expose more students to similar perspectives.