Radars help create 3-D view of structure, age of Greenland's ice

Radars help create 3-D view of structure, age of Greenland's ice

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first-ever comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet. Engineers and researchers at the University of Kansas were central to the success of this endeavor.

This new map allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths of Greenland’s ice, extending ice core data for a better picture of the ice sheet’s history.

“This new, huge data volume records how the ice sheet evolved and how it’s flowing today,” said Joe MacGregor, a glaciologist at the University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics and the study’s lead author.

Engineers at the National Science Foundation Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), headquartered at KU, were fundamental to this effort.

“The high-sensitivity radars developed by CReSIS at KU with long-term support from NSF and NASA enabled mapping of both shallow and deep internal layers for conducting this study,” said CReSIS Director Prasad Gogineni, a distinguished professor in the School of Engineering.

Full article

Read more:

Read more about the new Greenland Ice Layers Map at NASA.

See visualizations of the Greenland Ice Sheet stratigraphy.

Read more
Read the abstract of a recently published article in the Journal of Geophysical Research on this research.

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